The Making of 5 Broken Cameras: A One Day Workshop

[15]

Palestinian Territory 2011, 180 mins
Director: Emad Burnat, Guy Davidi

Join us for a one-day workshop at the Hackney Picturehouse with Guy Davidi, Co-Director of 5 Broken Cameras and Áine O’Brien, Co-Director of Counterpoints Arts.

5 Broken Cameras has struck a dramatic chord with international audiences and won scores of prestigious awards, including World Cinema Documentary Directing at Sundance, Audience Award at Sheffield, IDFA Special Jury and Audiences Award, and Best Documentary at Jerusalem Film Festival.

In 2005, there were two arrivals in Emad Burnat’s home: his son Gibreel, and his first video camera. Compelled to capture the constant antagonism Gibreel would face in the shadow of Israel’s security barrier, Burnat began filming. With the help of Jewish-Israeli filmmaker Davidi, his arresting footage has culminated in a film which dextrously meshes personal essay with political cinema, and demonstrates how images and cameras can change lives and realities.

‘One of the best, most involving documentaries of the past couple of years’ – Philip French, The Observer

Following a screening of 5 Broken Cameras in the cinema, the workshop will explore the film’s rich production history of interest to filmmakers, cultural workers, activists and socially engaged funders.

Workshop topics include:

• Co-creation between directors Burnat and Davidi, and the community in Bil'in

• Journey through ‘Greenhouse’ – a development programme for documentary filmmakers;

• Editing and evolution of documentary ‘story’

• Politics/practicalities of funding and distribution

• Challenges of public engagement and reaching diverse audiences

Ticket includes lunch, film screening, and invitation to the reception and private view of 'AUDIENCE' - a special exhibition of photographs curated to celebrate the film and the many different people who have engaged with it.

This workshop has been organized in partnership with One Stop Doc at Counterpoints Arts, and is supported by the Bertha Foundation and Shooting People.